July 2012: Accepting Diagnoses

RubyWe’ve had a lot of activity within the past 24 hours, but I thought it might be nice to get July’s topic up. . . well, in July.  So.

James was on the spot, and he thought something that deserved our attention was the idea of accepting a diagnosis/diagnoses.  I think he is on to something with the importance of discussing this.  He points out that accepting diagnoses is a process, and it doesn’t just happen overnight.  In his own words, it “takes time and adjustment.”  And as he wisely brings up, the newly diagnosed, and also families of the newly diagnosed, could really benefit from our experiences with this. Continue reading

Onwards & Upwards

SailorAs a person with more than her fair share of mental health problems, I find it really difficult to maintain relationships, mainly friendships (I don’t trust people enough for any other kind!).

I always put this down to perhaps I’m a horrible person. I seem to go through friends like nobodies business and always blame myself when the friendship falls apart.

Since my diagnosis with Borderline Personality Disorder (or Emotional Dysregulation Disorder, whatever you want to call it), researching the illness and the way other sufferers perceive the world has helped me realise that I’m not entirely to blame and it is my point of view of things that is askew. Continue reading

I Am Not OK, But That Is OK

SailorI’ve been wondering recently (as always) why I am the way I am.

I’ve been trying to come up with an explanation.

It feels like I can’t help these ways.  I think the way I think because of all that I am, and all that has happened.  I feel like I use it as an excuse, but am I allowed to feel that way? Continue reading

Therapy

photo (6)I can’t believe I haven’t written about my therapist yet. After all these years: we’ve been partners in this odd relationship since 1999 or so. On and off, but still. She’s seen me through some fearsome places. She tells me now how much better I am, and I believe her, because she’s been there for me when I wasn’t.

Back then around the turn of this latest century, I was a pretty busy humanoid indeed. I had just moved to beautiful Western North Carolina from even more beautiful Northern Utah, ostensibly because I wanted to spend more time with my father, who had just suffered a minor heart attack and got a stent for his trouble. Continue reading

Mental Differences In Children (June ‘Let’s Talk About’)

RubySo there was no Let’s Talk About for May, I know.  There were a lot of behind-the-scenes things happening (wonderful bloggers added, site makeover, ideas germinating), and it simply didn’t happen.  So to make sure we have something to talk about this month, I’m writing this up.

You’ll notice I used the term “mental differences.”  For those of you who know me, or who have read my blog or this one for any length of time, you know that I have an ambivalent relationship with the term “mental illness,” and thus “mental differences” was born. Continue reading

Interactions with Mental Health Professionals

AngelThis topic stems from an idea that I had in relation to the post Be Your Own Advocate.

It’s something I occasionally allude to on my personal blog and in my comments on others’ blogs. Over the last two and a half years (has it really only been that long?), I’ve learned a lot about how to compose myself when discussing matters with other mental health professionals.

First, let’s go over my successive period of interactions with mental health professionals. Continue reading

While there’s life, there’s hope

SailorDum, dum de dum.

Where do I start?

Hello, my name is Hello Sailor, but you can call me Sailor.

I was shocked to be asked to join Canvas, but that doesn’t seem like a good starting point. Continue reading

Rehabilitation after hospitalisation

the qiuet borderlineNearly two years ago, I had a mental breakdown. I struggled for 8 months going to therapy and trying several different medications before things became too serious and unbearable and so I went in to hospital. During these 8 months prior to hospitalisation, things snowballed out of control. I was self-harming and committing self-destructive acts and generally toiling with my own life. It was probably only a matter of time until something serious would have happened to me so I am thankful to my psychologist and to myself, that we could see that I couldn’t continue on and we needed something to change big time. Continue reading